poetry

Writing update 2022 (2/4)

Here is the next group of my published work this year, another thirty titles online, in print, and even streaming audio. As in the last set, for the ones which appear between covers along with other items of fantastic poetry and prose, I’ve put up some images of how those volumes look. In among the fantasy and science fiction and surrealism there are a few mainstream pieces there, maybe on the edge of speculation.

The business of rejections

An iron arm, of Italian workmanship I decided to write about some numbers about receiving rejections after I saw this tweet: Writers don't share every rejection, only the acceptances, so I expect most of us probably have very skewed ideas about each other's levels of success. — Jonathan Louis Duckworth (@Joduckwo) April 6, 2022 I don’t have any problem showing how many rejections I get for the poems I’m submitting to journals, drawing on statistics I have available through Duotrope.

Writing update 2022 (1/4)

Last year was my most active year when it came to having poetry appear in print. I was not sure whether I was going to keep up the pace this year, given the many distractions the world has been throwing at me, but as I look back at January through March, I can see that the results are actually coming in even faster. I have 28 pieces either online or in print which is more than half of my total for last year (51).

My 2021 Writing

Photo by Jason Dent on Unsplash I had a good year getting my poetry published both online and in print, and I wanted to have a full list up summarizing what is out there for anyone interested. For those interested, I will start out by sharing a little bit of my experience producing poetry and having people read it. I was going to say that I don’t have any training in this, but in fact I did take one course in college from a young instructor where we learned about English poetic forms and turned in assignments based on what we found out.

A few more things to stir the creative juices

I thought I’d put out another collection of tidbits I ran across that give me ideas of things I might want to do or create. There are lots of other preoccupations in my mind besides these, but I prefer to collect the ones worth keeping around Every night we are witnesses to a bigger bunch of explosions than anything ever shot up into the sky, though we don’t get to hear the sounds of all that energy being released.

My writing in 2020

Photo by Jr Korpa on Unsplash Here is where you can find where I published my speculative poetry in 2020. Solo poems Star*Line 43.1: a sword I did Eye to the Telescope 36: New house Two poems in bones journal 20: [pupate] and [Krishna sheds] Two poems in Failed Haiku Volume 5 Issue 20: [reactor control] and [receding glow] Collaborative poems With John W Sexton Five poems in Live Encounters Poetry and Writing: eczema nations, orgasm software, nebular gates, pumice velocities, and pastel sabbath Four poems in otoliths: zohar punk, in lieu of flowers, whitepigs trot sky, and talibanshee wail, also available as print on demand Three poems in Danse Macabre: fat burns off, verdigris, and white matter chambers Three poems in bones journal 20: protean jihad, omelette padme hum, and saltpetre the cat Under the Basho 2020: yes no urge

Five scifaiku months

© publicdomainstockphotos Free photo ID 84930337 | Dreamstime.com This is the third year I engaged in the discipline of writing and posting a poem on the Yahoo groups Scifaiku list I’ve been a member of for a dozen years or so. In past years I maintained a scifaiku writing timetable. One year, I wrote a new poem every single day for the entire year to see how much of a challenge that would be for me.

NaHaiWriMo 2017

For a number of years Michael Dylan Welch has been organizing National Haiku Writing Month, more commonly known as NaHaiWriMo during the month of February where anyone can post their minimalistic poetic contributions every day. There would be a prompt for each day the participants could, if they wanted, use as a theme for that day’s installment. I had fun participating this year and would like to present a selection of what I came up with.

Emily

I think I should explain the title of this blog in case you’re wondering. I’ll do this beauty pageant style. Coming in third, purely in my subjective opinion, was the title Like Breadths of Topaz which comes from Emily Dickinson’s poem ‘304’. As you’ll begin to understand in a moment, I really like her work. I think this line would make a fantastic name for a blog, particularly one which talks about beautiful things.